Invaluable Safety Tips For Journalists

Invaluable Safety Tips For Journalists


Guest Post

Spooked – or Ghosted? How To End Journalistic Surveillance

The safety of journalists and the protection of their sources have been put under the spotlight in the last few months.

On the 4th of July, 2018, activist group Right2Know released a revealing report entitled “Spooked: The Surveillance of South African Journalists.” In it, the report detailed stories of journalists like Sam Sole, Jacques Pauw, Tom Nkosi and the SABC 8 and provides more information about South African security agencies.

The report also includes recommendations on how journalists can be protected, especially by service providers like Vodacom, MTN and CellC.

“It is beyond urgent that South Africa essentially rebuilds its intelligence structures from the ground up, in particular the State Security Agency and the police’s Crime Intelligence Division.” – Spooked: The Surveillance of South African Journalists – A Report by Right2Know

It just confirmed what many journalists had already suspected: Someone is always watching.

It’s essential for journalists to protect themselves – and their sources. Here are some practical safety tips, websites, software, and apps for the tech-smart journalist.

5 Practical Safety Tips for Journalists

1. Knowledge is power.

Learn more about technology and new developments: This includes cybersecurity, new software updates and security flaws; also keep your finger on the pulse of what other journalists over the world are doing to keep themselves safe.

2. Paper trails can pose a danger.

Writing sensitive information down on paper poses a huge security risk and can be a danger to your sources. Stick with digitised, cloud stored and encrypted information.

3. Make use of burner devices.

Burner devices are meant to be used temporarily and discarded; while you don’t have to discard a device, use a cheaper phone (without sensitive information) for everyday travelling, and have more than one laptop should one be seized or stolen.

4. Encryption is never completely safe.

Don’t become relaxed in your methods just because you assume you’re protected. Every poison has an antidote, and every encryption has a key. Common sense (and multi-level encryption methods) go a very long way.

5. Painfully obvious things.

Many painfully obvious things can also pose a danger: Taking phone conversations within earshot of others, writing a source’s details down on a piece of paper. Again, common sense.

Websites, Software, and Apps

Switch Your E-Mail Accounts

E-mail presents one of the biggest vulnerabilities for journalists and their sources. Especially sensitive stories will warrant a completely separate e-mail account to your own, and ensure that your main e-mail account remains well protected.

ProtonMail

ProtonMail is a Swiss-developed secure e-mail server, and highly recommended for anyone with sensitive information being transmitted through e-mail. There’s a way to recover your passwords, but beware that using password recovery will wipe the entire e-mail account clean.

Mailvelope

Mailvelope is a highly recommended and open source e-mail encryption tool, developed with the idea of incorporating itself into your existing e-mail client. Also take a look at a similar encryption program called Pretty Good Privacy.

CounterMail

CounterMail is another encrypted e-mail client, and one that works around PGP-encryption.

Encrypt Your Flash Drives

Flash drives are great for storing information, but mean nothing if they are hacked, misplaced or stolen.

IronKey USB Flash Drives

IronKey USB Flash Drives are worth their price tag. They’re equipped with special automatic encryption, and they have a useful instant-erase option for sensitive data in danger. Some USB drives (like this Encrypted Flash Drive) come with a PIN lock.

BitLocker

BitLocker is a full hard-drive (or USB drive) encryption tool by Microsoft Windows. Similar tools include VeraCrypt and DiskCryptor.

Instant Messaging

Signal

Signal is a free, open source communication tool designed with journalists in mind. All communication is encrypted on both ends, making it especially popular, and users can send files, or make voice or video calls.

Telegram Messenger

Telegram Messenger is an encrypted open source communication program that allows for heavy encryption of files – and has an added self-destruction feature for sensitive data.

Safe Search Engines

Using your main search engine while you are logged in while searching for sensitive information is a terrible idea. Use a safe search engine instead.

DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo is the search engine that promises not to store your information or your services, and it’s a hugely popular option for tech experts and journalists.

StartPage

If it’s a Google search you want, StartPage is a search engine that duplicates the search results of the search engine giant, but without the privacy invasion of having your searches saved.

Search Encrypt

Search Encrypt does just that and encrypts your search terms to hide them from any prying eyes.

Other Safety Tools

Salama

Salama is a tool designed with assessing a journalist’s potential risk – and providing them with subsequent safety tips that are relevant to their risk-levels.          

by Alex J. Coyne

About the Author: Alex J. Coyne is a freelance journalist, author and language practitioner. He has written for a diverse range of international publications, blogs and clients including People Magazine, Funds for Writers, The Dollar Stretcher, The Investor, CollegeHumor and Great Bridge Links, among others. Find more information about his writing and courses aimed at journalists at Alex J. Coyne.

If you enjoyed this, read:

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  2. The 18 Essential Rules Of Journalism
  3. 9 Things That Can (& Will) Go Wrong When You Conduct An Interview
  4. 8 Lessons Freelancing Taught Me About Money
  5. Skeleton Keys: A Horror Story That Will Scare All Writers

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This article has 2 comments

  1. tron

    You should eliminate Telegram from your list its highly insecure! Use Conversations.im instead or Signal

  2. Liz McIntyre

    Hi Alex. Good to see tips for journalist privacy. Very important!

    Thanks for mentioning Startpage.com for search privacy. Have you checked out the complete redesign at new.startpage.com? It’s a fully working preview where you can test new features like “Anonymous View.” Anonymous View is another tool for journalists and would make a terrific article on its own. Please email me if you’d like more information.

Comments are now closed.