44 Common Confusions To Annoy The Grammar Police

44 Common Confusions To Annoy The Grammar Police


In these infographics, we share 44 common confusions to annoy the grammar police.

Jennifer Frost writes: ‘Do you know someone who works for the grammar police?

It might be a friend, relative, or co-worker who always picks out errors in articles and books, and corrects your speech when you get a bit lax.

Well, there’s a way to defend yourself against the grammar police. The following infographics cover some of the most commonly confused English terms. You can study these infographics and use them to overcome those words and phrases that you find especially tricky.

In fact, this topic is so expansive that they are divided into two separate infographics. Once you’ve digested one, you can move on to the other. Feeling ambitious? Take them both in at once.

The full blog post goes into more detail. You can check it out here: Common Confusions

Take notes and start giving those grammar cops a run for their money.’

44 Common Confusions To Annoy The Grammar Police

Source for infographics: Grammar Check: Part 1 and Part 2

If you are looking for more infographics, you might like these:

  1. 17 Pretentious Words & What to Use Instead
  2. 15 Grammar Rules It’s Okay to Break
  3. 10 Editing Tips That’ll Instantly Make You a Better Writer
  4. How To Check Your Grammar In Email
  5. How Meditation Can Improve Your Writing
  6. 7 Secrets Of Advanced English Writing
  7. Breaking Down Writer’s Block

Top Tip: If you want to learn how to write a book, sign up for our online course or join our course in Johannesburg.

This article has 1 comment

  1. JACQUELINE HOUCHIN

    I wish you had mentioned BEAR and BARE. I know the latter means clothes-less, but does the former mean both the animal, and to assume weight or bring?

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