The 10 Most Basic Business Communications You Can't Afford To Get Wrong

The 10 Most Basic Business Communications You Can’t Afford To Get Wrong


Writers Write creates resources for business writers. In this post, we include the 10 most basic business communications you can’t afford to get wrong.

Dear Big Business

Do you know that you will conduct 70% of your business with the electronic written word?

  1. If you write an invitation, you want me to accept.
  2. If you write a warning label, you need to make me aware of a potential risk.
  3. If you write a proposal, you want to persuade me that your company is my best option.
  4. If you write a business plan, you want to persuade me that your idea will work.

I hope you’ve heard of Faith Popcorn who wrote about cocooning in the 1990s? Cocooning is a trend where we socialise less and retreat into our homes. Communication in the coming decades will change. How will you persuade me to emerge from my shelter? How will you invite me into your world?

I don’t know if you realise how crucial good writing skills are. To get my attention, you will have to communicate with me in a professional, error-free manner.

You will have to do this in so many ways.

The 10 Most Basic Business Communications You Can’t Afford To Get Wrong

Here are 10 examples:

  1. Invitations
  2. CVs
  3. Emails to request a meeting or to close a deal
  4. Fund-raising documents
  5. Letters of demand
  6. Memos
  7. Press releases
  8. Proposals and reports
  9. Recruitment offers
  10. Requests for an overdraft or a salary increase

You need to learn how to present an argument, ask a question, and close a deal.

How confident are you that your company’s writing skills will stand up to this challenge?

Kind regards
Your Potential Customer

If you want to improve your business writing skills, join us for The Plain Language Programme.

by Amanda Patterson

© Amanda Patterson

If you enjoyed this article, read these posts:

  1. A Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Write Minutes
  2. A Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Write Notices
  3. A Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Format Your Emails
  4. How to Deflate those Inflated Phrases
  5. Why The Elevator Pitch Will Always Be Effective In Business Writing

This article has 3 comments

  1. Stacy

    Hi Amanda — Can I repost this on my site? It’s perfect.

  2. Writers Write

    Hi Stacy
    Yes, you can. Please link it back to this post, and credit Amanda.

  3. Daryl

    “If you write a warning label, you need to make me aware of a potential risk”. Not quite true, I’m afraid. If we write a warning label, we need to comply with legal requirements, without scaring the shit out of our customers. Which is probably a little bit evil, but a much more interesting writing challenge, and therefore ok.

Comments are now closed.