Literary Birthday – 8 January – Wilkie Collins


Wilkie Collins was born 8 January 1824, and died 23 September 1889

Nine Quotes

  1. I have always held the old-fashioned opinion that the primary object of work of fiction should be to tell a story.
  2. No sensible man ever engages, unprepared, in a fencing match of words with a woman.
  3. If the public only knew that every writer worthy of the name is the severest critic of his own book before it ever gets into the hands of the reviewers, how surprised they would be!
  4. Books – the generous friends who met me without suspicion – the merciful master who never used me ill!
  5. The dull people decided years and years ago, as everyone knows, that novel-writing was the lowest species of literary exertion, and that novel reading was a dangerous luxury and an utter waste of time.
  6. The best men are not consistent in good– why should the worst men be consistent in evil.
  7. Women can resist a man’s love, a man’s fame, a man’s personal appearance, and a man’s money, but they cannot resist a man’s tongue when he knows how to talk to them.
  8. There are few higher, better, or more profitable enjoyments in this world than reading a good novel.
  9. The man who has worked in the full fervour of composition yesterday is the same man who sits in severe and merciless judgement to-day on what he has himself produced.

Wilkie Collins was an English novelist, playwright, and short story writer. He wrote 30 novels, 60 short stories, 14 plays, and more than 100 essays during the Victorian era. His best-known works are The Woman in WhiteThe MoonstoneArmadale, and No Name. Collins was a lifelong friend of Charles Dickens. A number of his works were published in Dickens’s journals. The two collaborated and some of Collins’s plays were performed by Dickens’s acting company.

Source for Image

 by Amanda Patterson

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