Literary Birthday – 26 May – Simon Armitage


Seven Quotes

  1. People who read poetry, for example, like the feel, the heft and the smell of a book.
  2. We don’t know where print is going.
  3. It’s never going to be very mainstream. One reason is that poetry requires concentration, both on the part of the writer and the reader. But it’s kind of unkillable, poetry. It’s our most ancient artform and I think it’s more relevant today than ever, because it’s one person saying what they really believe.
  4. We still need a voice that thinks before it speaks.
  5. I have to make myself write, sometimes. In the space between poems, you somehow forget how to do it, where to begin. It was good to be task-based for a while. I just came downstairs each day, picked the one I was going to do that day, and wrote.
  6. I’ve always tried to think of poetry as an active ingredient in the language rather than just something that appears between the covers of thin books.
  7. Prose fills a space, like a liquid poured in from the top, but poetry occupies it, arrays itself in formation, sets up camp and refuses to budge.

Simon Armitage is an ward-winning British poet, playwright, and novelist. His poetry collections include Book of Matches and The Dead Sea Poems. He has written two novels, Little Green Man and The White Stuff, as well as All Points North, a collection of essays on the north of England, and Walking Home: A Poet’s Journey.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson