Three things every writer needs to stay in the game

(This is Anthony Ehlers' final post for 2014. He will be on holiday until 8 January 2015. Look out for his next post then.)

In her engaging, funny new memoir, Sister, Mother, Husband, Dog, Etc., Delia Ephron, author and sister to the late Nora, writes about how she became a writer after her divorce. A therapist told her that a writer needed discipline and suggested a writing routine that would get her to her writing desk every day.

Magic formula?  There isn’t any…

This got me thinking about the writers we’ve hosted at our Writers Write dinners over the years. I always used to take copious notes, hoping to find that elusive magic formula for success. After listening to the same advice come out, just in a different way, I realised there are three qualities that emerged in just about every single interview.

  1. A writer must have discipline. Sporadic and uneven writing produces sporadic and uneven results.  I know. It’s how I tend to write – in fits and bursts. You get to live for the highs, like a publication date of a short story or doing well in a scriptwriting competition and then live off the euphoria. A director once told me, ‘Don’t chase the highs – work steadily even when nothing seems to be happening.’ That means having a schedule and sticking to it.
  2. A writer must have stamina. I guess we could say mental stamina – the ability to go under, like a submarine, and focus on the book in front of you. When I was under deadline this year, I wrote for twelve hours at a time and had to learn – painfully – to stay in the zone even when my eyes felt like bleeding. It was a good lesson to learn. Of course, we could say you need physical stamina too. Natalie Goldberg suggest taking up running because it teaches you to stay in the zone similar to writing. What we need to learn to do is take better care of ourselves.
  3. A writer needs recognition. Nothing kills talent, spirit or motivation more than being ignored. It doesn’t matter if you’re writing a blog or showing your pages to a friend, you need some validation to keep going. Some good reviews in a paper or an encouraging email from a writing buddy keeps me going when I feel like giving up. Don’t isolate yourself – be brave, send your stuff in the world. We tell stories to make sense of the world. We also tell stories to connect with others.

You’ll notice I didn’t mention talent.

Pshh! Talent on its own is like a car without fuel or wheels. It won’t get you anywhere. Many famous and rich authors have built careers on very little talent. What set them apart is the ability to keep going until they saw the finish line – and then found the bum-glue, grit and innate belief in themselves to start the race again.

 by Anthony Ehlers

(If you enjoyed this post, you will love 12-Steps to Self-Editing - your stress-free guide to preparing a manuscript)

Anthony has facilitated courses for Writers Write since 2007. Published both locally and internationally, he was twice a runner-up in the Mills&Boon Voice of Africa short story competition. In 2013, his crime short story was included in Bloody Satisfied, an anthology sponsored by the National Arts Festival SA. As a scriptwriter, he has written three television features. In 2014, his short films were short-listed for the Jameson First Shot competition, as well as the European Independent Film Festival. Follow Anthony on Twitter and Facebook.

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Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

Writers Write - Write to communicate

How To Use The Senses To Show And Not Tell

Mia Botha will be on holiday until 7 January 2015. Look out for her next post then.

My post last week was Five Incredibly Simple Ways to Help Writers Show and Not Tell. Today I want to discuss Tip 2 – Use the Senses – in more detail. 

I suggested: Write a list of what your character sees, hears, feels, touches and tastes. Then write about it without using the words see, hear, feel, touch and taste. 

Writing with the senses is brilliant advice. When you write with the senses, you engage your readers’ emotions. When you don’t use the words see, hear, feel, touch and taste you remove a barrier between yourself and your reader. You know when you read a book and you tell people: ‘It was like I was there.’? Go take a look, I bet the author wrote making use of the senses. 

Consider these examples: 

Example 1: 

Sandra walked through her childhood home for the first time in twenty years. They were so happy here. She touched the smooth railing and remembered sliding down the banister; she could feel the wet cement between her fingers from when they made imprints when Dad built up the courtyard. She remembered when Mom helped them to make their birthday cupcakes. She could still smell the vanilla. The kitchen had always been her favourite place. She remembered lining up so Mom could mark their height against the doorjamb. She could almost hear the yapping puppy they got for their birthday, the puppy that chewed a hole through the door.
And she remembered what is was like after they found her sister and the puppy in the pool. After, there was no more sliding, no more cupcakes, no more marks on the doorjamb. Not even hers, even though she was still alive. It was time to pack it all up. 

Now, think about what she saw, heard, felt, tasted and touched. 

Example 2 

Sandra ran her hand along the banister. The dark wood smooth from years of sliding. Her twenty year absence obvious in each cobweb corner. The movers were coming tomorrow. Everything had to go, but where to start? The kitchen. It had always been her favourite place.
The cupboard door creaked. The cupcake pan gave off a red powdery dust. The scent of birthday cupcakes replaced by the acidity of oxidising metal. It landed with a clang next to the dustbin.
She opened the back door, the hinges protesting. She needed the big black bin. She ignored the chew marks the puppy had made in the wood.
Two tiny hands pressed deep into the cement caught her eye. Her palm rested on the too small imprint. She shook her hand just as she had the day they made them and tried to shake off the memories. She couldn’t do it. She knew the markings would be on the doorjamb behind her, but she didn’t look around.
She knew they stopped. At the age of five. Two marks. Two girls. One dead. One alive. Sort of.
The puppy was a birthday present. Shelly had wanted to save the puppy. No one knew he had chewed a hole through the door. No one knew the pool was open. 
She scribbled a note to remind herself to buy paint for the doorjamb. 

Deconstructing the examples 

By using the senses you force your character to interact with the scene making it more of a showing scene. But I am only using one technique so this example still uses a lot of telling. (I would perhaps change the scene to add a conversation with a nosey estate agent to show her history.) 

A last note, did you notice there was too much I tried to highlight? When you make your list of senses use all five, and use them all when you write. Once you are done, go back and decide which are important to the scene. Chances are you won’t use all five senses in every scene. 

How to decide? My scene goal was to show you that her sister had died and that it changed her family forever. The puppy, the cupcakes, and the marks on the doorjamb all tie in with a birthday so I think they work and birthdays are great markers to show change. But the handprints in the cement? I like the image, but I might use it somewhere else or not at all. 

Sometimes we have to tell

There were some interesting comments last week in favour of telling. I love showing, but I agree there are a few instances when you have to tell. I will always try to keep those to a minimum, but there are writers who enjoy it. Amanda wrote a post about when you should tell. Follow the link to read more: Five instances when you need to tell (and not show)

 by Mia Botha

If you enjoyed this post, you will love We are pro the prologue - sometimes.

Mia Botha facilitates for Writers Write. She is also a novelist, a ghost writer, and the winner of the Mills&Boon Voice of Africa Competition. When she isn’t writing, she is the mother of two children and the wife of a very lucky man. Follow Mia on Pinterest and Facebook and Tumblr and Twitter

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    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    Six Lessons We've Learnt From Jane Austen - on love, life and writing

    Today is the anniversary of Jane Austen's birthday. She was born 16 December 1775 and died 18 July 1817

    I have always loved Jane Austen. I even chose to write about Austen and Feminism many many years ago at university – long before it became fashionable. But why do we love her stories? What is it about them that is timeless? 

    Many would argue that Jane Austen is simply historical chick lit and they wouldn’t be wrong. Chick lit gets a bad rap most of the time. It is not all fluff and nonsense, and like writers in any other genre, some authors are better than others. Jane Austen is a master of this one. 

    Austen creates believable, flawed characters who are easy to relate to and she puts them in difficult situations. Times have changed but human nature has not. We've all behaved badly, meddled when we should not have, and judged others without the facts. Her characters show us how to learn and grow from this. And most importantly, we all want to love and be loved - just like the characters in her six novels.

    Here are six universal lessons Jane taught us from each of her novels. 

    Emma: Learn to listen and pay attention to everyday matters. The most important things in our lives are the little moments – the conversations, the shared laughter, friendships, and confidences. Emma has to learn that everyone matters, that she is not more important than anyone else, and that moments with her family and friends are precious. She has to learn to stop interfering. Emma does not listen to Harriet Smith who loves Robert Martin. She tries to part them, but luckily they get together in the end.

    Pride and Prejudice: Learn from mistakes. First impressions can be misleading as Elizabeth and Darcy have to find out in the novel. Sometimes we have to go through moments of heartbreak and humiliation before we learn our lesson. Elizabeth has to learn that Wickham is a cad. We also have to be prepared to admit when we are wrong and to apologise if necessary. We should not be afraid to show how we feel. Jane almost loses Bingley by being so reserved. Elizabeth almost loses Darcy because her feelings have been hurt.

    Northanger Abbey: Keep a sense of wonder alive. Life is an adventure. Be curious. The young heroine, Catherine is just learning about herself, her world, and the people she wants in it. She has to learn to be open to change and growth. If we don’t, we assume things based on what we have been taught rather than what really is in front of our eyes.

    Mansfield Park: Money is not everything. We have to understand the difference between being entertained and being happy. Maria Bertram marries Mr Rushworth because of his fortune, and because she just got snubbed by Henry Crawford. Her story does not end well, but our stories are what make us human. Listening to someone's stories and bearing witness is the highest way of acknowledging our humanity. Poor, quiet, heroine, Fanny Price has to learn that we don't always get what we want.

    Persuasion: Be honest and think for ourselves. Unconditional friendship serves no one. Anne Elliot breaks off her engagement with Frederic Wentworth on the advice of her friend, Lady Russel, which results in years of heartache. Anne learns about the values of community and friendship, which are harder to find and hold on to as we age.

    Sense and Sensibility: True love takes time. Sisters, Elinor and Marianne, both fall in love with men they can’t have. To love someone we have to like their characters as well as their looks. Marianne Dashwood finds this out when she learns the truth about Willoughby and gets to know Colonel Brandon. Healthy conflicts keep relationships sound. Marrying someone who helps us to grow is the truest way of knowing and loving ourselves.

    These universal stories are the reason that Jane Austen is as popular now as she ever was.

    ~~~~~

     by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers WriteThe Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her on PinterestFacebookGoogle+Tumblr and Twitter.  

    ~~~~~

    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    Character Development Checklist - 13 Points To Consider

    Character is plot, plot is character. ~F. Scott Fitzgerald


    In an ideal world, novelists would perfectly combine plotting and characterisation. Instead of having character-driven novels or plot-driven novels, we would have unforgettable characters reacting to the events created by a brilliantly paced plot. If writers tie the character’s motivation and story goal to the plot, they won’t have a problem with this. The character should suit the plot. The plot should suit the character. 

    The novels I remember best have empathetic characters whose motivations I understand – even if I don’t agree with them - and a plot that I can’t stop thinking about. The best novels make me think – that could happen, and what would I do if it happened to me?

    As authors we like our protagonists. We are tempted to protect them from trouble. That temptation must be resisted. ~Donald Maass

    The best way to take protagonists out of their comfort zones is by creating impressive antagonists. If your story were told from the antagonist’s viewpoint, he or she should be strong enough and complicated enough to be the hero of the story. 

    One of the ways of creating great characters for your story idea is by filling in character questionnaires, giving them flaws and strengths, and asking them difficult questions.

    Here is a great checklist to see if you have created a worthy protagonist and antagonist for your plot.

    © Character Checklist Infographic by Martina Boone (@MartinaABoone)


     by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers WriteThe Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her on PinterestFacebookGoogle+Tumblr and Twitter.  

    Text © Amanda Patterson

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    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    10 Bookish Christmas Trees

    Even if you do not celebrate Christmas, it's still fun to see how creative bookish people can be with ideas for Christmas trees.

    Source: design-dautore

    Source: desiretoinspire

    Source: lauriehalseanderson

    Source: reimaginedonline

    Source: Karoo Writers Festival

    Source: Shelf Awareness

    Source: Twitter

    Source: NUC Christmas Tree

    Source: Freedom Series

    Source: presentandcorrect

    Looking for more? Follow this link: Bookish Christmas Trees

     by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers WriteThe Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her on PinterestFacebookGoogle+Tumblr and Twitter.  

    ~~~~~

    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    The 23 Best Bookish Gifts - 2014

    Are you looking for a bookish gift for the reader or the writer in your life? 

    We put together a selection of gifts in December 2011 and thought we should update it for 2014. We hope you find something that you like.

    1. Wall Scrabble

    2. Romeo and Juliet Tights

    3. Real Men Read Books Tote

    4. Shakespearean Insult Bandages

    5. Writers Write Gift Voucher - make someone’s writing dreams come true. 

    6. Bookish Masking Tape

    7. To Quote Hamlet Shirt

    8. The Hobbit Map Dress

    9. Free Verse Reveries Duvet Cover

    10. Coffee and Literary Rage Shirt

    11. Born to Write Necklace

    12. Harry Potter Beachwear

    13. Team Katniss Shirt

    14. Library Card Socks

    15. Ampersand Necklace

    16. Library Stamp Sweater

    17. Write from the heart pencils

    18. Introvert's Mug

    19. Little Free Library - Red British Phone Booth Edition ('Take a book, return a book') 

    20. Famous Authors - candle holders

    21. "Where there is no imagination, there is no horror". -Arthur Conan Doyle Quote Cuff

    22. Jules Verne Inspired Seampunk Flask

    23. Book Nerd Necklace

    If you're looking for more ideas, browse through our Bookish Stuff board on Pinterest. If you're looking for a good book, read Writers Write Reviewers Choose Their Top Books of 2014.

    ~~~~~

     by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers WriteThe Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her on PinterestFacebookGoogle+Tumblr and Twitter.  

    ~~~~~

    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate


    12-Steps to Self-Editing - your stress-free guide to preparing a manuscript

    When we talk about rewriting in Writers Write, delegates often go a bit pale. They seem to think that you need to rewrite a story or novel from scratch. While certain drafts do need to start their journey again from a blank page, if you have a reasonable first draft, you can follow these 12 chronological steps to make self-editing more manageable.

    1. Read through. Print out your manuscript, make yourself a coffee and grab a pencil. Read it from beginning to end as a dispassionate reader. Make the odd comment in the margin if something glaring pops up, but hold back from making detailed notes. The idea is just to get an idea of the global story, the flow, and the feel of it.
    2. Plot line. Now it’s time to interrogate the plot and determine if there’s enough conflict in the story. Look at each scene and sequel to see if you’ve unpacked the major story question posed by the inciting incident. As Sol Stein suggests, compare your strongest scene with your weakest scene. Decide if the weaker one can be recycled or rewritten.
    3. Hero in the spotlight. Here we pick apart the main character. A good idea is to create a character sheet that you can create from the character wheel – write a paragraph under the headings of his psychological, physical and socio-economic make-up. Make sure that every decision or behaviour he displays in the story is consistent with these traits.
    4. Rattle the cage for the antagonist. The next step is to do the same for the antagonist. Make sure that he is positioned to bring out the most conflict from your main character. Nothing destroys a story like unfair odds between the hero and his nemesis. Make sure he is equally strong, if not a bit more wily than your main character. If you need to plug more into your plot, go back to step two.
    5. Dust off your supporting cast. To a lesser degree, you will do the same for the other characters in the story. While they may not need the same magnifying glass, you should make sure they’re fulfilling their roles in a vivid, lively and engaging way. A tip is to spend just 10-20 minutes on each, freewriting or brainstorming ideas to make them pop. Feed these into the story.
    6. Infuse your palette. Now it’s time to look at setting. Try to put in setting detail where it’s lacking or unclear and to cull places where you’ve been overly descriptive. Make sure you’ve used as many senses as possible to bring these to life. Take time out to do research on places you’re unfamiliar with so that these parts of your book hum with authenticity.
    7. Talk it out. If step six asks you to look at the manuscript with a fresh eye, this one demands you bring a keen ear. Read your dialogue aloud or record it and play it back to yourself. Does it sound realistic? It should give us information about the characters – it must tease out their individuality, their background and, at the same time, move the story forward. Read plays or movie scripts for inspiration.
    8.  It’s a sprint, not a marathon. Now you should look at pacing. Does your manuscript have enough white space? Try to keep sentences and paragraphs as short as possible – just keep in mind that some genres allow for a more leisurely pace than, say, a thriller. If you’re getting bored reading a page, be sure your reader will be too. Be merciless. A tip is to cut every second or third word and see if the story can survive these cuts.
    9. Beginnings, middles and ends. Look at your first and last page side by side. If you can, try to bring in symbols, images or moods that echo or contrast each other. Find a way to create bookends that will resonate with the reader in a subliminal way.  Now go to the middle of the book – the hinge - and see if this section of the book is a powerful enough mid-point to drive the story towards its climax. It should be a false high point or false low point for the main character and reaffirm his commitment to the story goal.
    10. Become a continuity editor. Put the manuscript away for at least eight weeks, longer if you can manage it. Print out a fresh copy and look for consistency and clarity on every page, every line, in every word. Look for gremlins – a character’s eye-colour changing from one chapter to the next or someone encountering a tiger in Africa. A good way to do this is to imagine each chapter is a stage play – have you signposted your stage directions in a clear, but unobtrusive way.
    11. Polish it till it shines. Now – and only now, we might add – do you do a linear edit of the manuscript. You check spelling, you check grammar, you check that your formatting is consistent. It’s like dressing your book up for a red-carpet event – it needs to be flawless. A sloppy manuscript – no matter how promising – is often passed over for a mediocre story well-presented when it crosses an editor’s desk.
    12. Find another eye. If you have an objective friend, freelance editors or an online community of beta readers, give them the manuscript to read over and encourage constructive feedback. This is the time to put your ego on the backburner and be open-minded. Listen to what they say, take notes and see if their points are valid.

    After this, it’s time to make final checks and changes and prepare your manuscript for its final journey – to an agent, editor or print if you’re self-publishing.

    Think of your book as your 18-year old kid going off to college or varsity. You’ve done the best you can, given them warm clothes and a stern lecture – maybe even a flurry of good luck kisses. Now it’s up to your book to stand on its own.

     by Anthony Ehlers

    (If you enjoyed this post, you will love Mirror, Mirror – the role of supporting characters)

    Anthony has facilitated courses for Writers Write since 2007. Published both locally and internationally, he was twice a runner-up in the Mills&Boon Voice of Africa short story competition. In 2013, his crime short story was included in Bloody Satisfied, an anthology sponsored by the National Arts Festival SA. As a scriptwriter, he has written three television features. In 2014, his short films were short-listed for the Jameson First Shot competition, as well as the European Independent Film Festival. Follow Anthony on Twitter and Facebook.

    ~~~~~

    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    December discount for aspiring authors and memoirists

    Happy Holidays!

    If you want to join one of our courses in February or March 2015, we are offering a 10% discount if you book and pay for the course by 15 December 2014. 

    These are the courses we will run in February and March 2015:

    Course

    Description

    Writers Write

    How to Write a Book

    The Plain Language Programme

    Advanced Business Writing

    The Social Brand

    How to write for Social Media

    Kids etc.

    How to write Children’s Books

    Secrets of a Memoirist

    How to write a Memoir

    Please send an email to neo@writerswrite.co.za and ask for more information on the course that interests you.

    ~~~~~

      Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

      Writers Write - Write to communicate

      Five Incredibly Simple Ways to Help Writers Show and Not Tell

      Show me, show me.

      Show, don’t tell is one of the trickiest things for beginners to grasp. It’s something we teach on our Writers Write course, and it's an ‘aha moment’ that can’t be rushed. 

      Consider these examples:

      Example One:

      The detective was staring at the body. He saw that it was a female and that she had been stabbed. The coroner said that she had been dead for at least five hours. The body was decomposing fast. The heat was speeding up the process. The detective’s phone rang; he looked at the screen but didn’t answer. He looked at the body hoping to find clues. Her hair was dirty and uncombed. The smell was bad. His phone rang again. He ignored the call again. The alley was dirty and smelly. They would have to move fast. The sun was already up. The detective walked over to talk to the press. They had a serial killer on their hands. This was going to be a long hot day.  

      Example Two:

      Flies buzz over the corpse. The tiny black bodies frantic, jockeying for position as the coroner waves her hand.
      “What have we got?” Detective Anderson steps over a puddle - a mixture of blood and drain water that doesn’t bode well for the evidence. He fishes a ringing phone out of his pocket and glances at the screen. He stuffs it back into his pocket. He nods to the coroner.
      “Female, 24-28 years old, multiple stab wounds.” She moves a matted clump of dirty blonde hair out of the victim’s face. “Matches the description.”
      Shit, he hates it when missing people turn up dead. 
      Anderson pushing his sunglasses back up his nose and they slide right back down. Fucking summer.
      “Liver temp puts time of death at between 1am and 3am. Give or take a few. This weather isn’t helping. We are going to have to move fast.”
      “Do you think it’s him?” he asks.
      “I’ll need to run some tests at the lab, but it all fits. Same weapon, same MO, same everything.”
      Anderson tugs at his shirt and checks his phone as it rings again. Sweat drips from his brow. The air is heavy, humid, and fetid.
      “What are you going to tell them?” They both look at the clamouring group of journalists.
      “I am going to tell them we have a serial killer on our hands.” He strides towards the vultures and sends Sarah a text to cancel dinner.   

      What can you do to make sure you Show and not Tell?

      1. Choose a viewpoint character: It is easier if you are experiencing the scene as one character. You can even try writing a scene in first person if this is hard for you. Use it as practice. You can change the viewpoint later if needed. 
      2. Use the senses: Write a list of what your character sees, hears, feels, touches and tastes. Then write about it without using the words see, hear, feel, touch and taste.
      3. Be specific: The more specific you are with your descriptions and actions the easier it will become to show.
      4. Avoid these 'telling'words: is, are, was, were, have, had. (more telling words to avoid)
      5. Dialogue: This is one of the simplest tools to use. The moment your characters start talking, showing becomes easier.  

      Happy showing. 

       by Mia Botha

      If you enjoyed this post, you will love We are pro the prologue - sometimes.

      Mia Botha facilitates for Writers Write. She is also a novelist, a ghost writer, and the winner of the Mills&Boon Voice of Africa Competition. When she isn’t writing, she is the mother of two children and the wife of a very lucky man. Follow Mia on Pinterest and Facebook and Tumblr and Twitter

      ~~~~~

        Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

        Writers Write - Write to communicate

        The Top 10 Skills Employers Want


        Have You Got The Skills That Employers Are Looking For?

        Communicating features in most of these requirements. Written communication and verbal communication are must-have skills. 

        We need to educate people who communicate. We need to realise that big words do not make us sound intelligent. Complicated sentences do not give us substance. We need to write to communicate.

        We emphasise the importance of communicating clearly on our business writing course, The Plain Language Programme. It is a good idea to invest in yourself. Take time to learn how to write. You won't regret it.

        Read the full article here

        I believe companies should motivate their staff to write properly. Every staff member should attend a simple grammar refresher and email etiquette course. Only 2% of all the people I meet know how to construct sentences properly. Only 5% know how to convey what they want to say in writing. 

        We need to educate people who communicate. We need to realise that big words do not make us sound intelligent. Complicated sentences do not give us substance. We need to write to communicate.

        Email news@writerswrite.co.za to find out more about our business writing course, The Plain Language Programme. If you enjoyed this post, you will like If you want to earn more in any profession, improve your writing skills

         by Amanda Patterson

        Follow her on Facebook and Pinterest and Google+ and Tumblr and Twitter

        ~~~~~

        Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

        Writers Write - Write to communicate