30 (or so) Famous Fictional Cats

'If you want to write, keep cats.' ~Aldous Huxley

Saturday is known as #Caturday on the Internet. Writers have always been fascinated by cats and we're celebrating this Saturday with these Famous Bookish Cats.

  1. Bagheera from The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
  2. The Cheshire Cat from Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll 
  3. Church from Pet Sematary by Stephen King
  4. Moxie from The Subtle Knife by Philip Pullman
  5. Dinah from Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll 
  6. Black Cat from Cat from Hell by Stephen King
  7. Eureka from The Wizard of Oz by Frank L Baum
  8. Mehitabel from Archy and Mehitabel by Don Marquis
  9. Pluto from The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe
  10. Fat Louie from Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot 
  11. Figaro from Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi
  12. Ginger from The Last Battle by C. S. Lewis
  13. Graymalkin from Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  14. Harry the Cat from The Cricket in Times Square by George Selden
  15. Kitty from Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  16. Crookshanks from Harry Potter by JK Rowling
  17. Koko and Yum-yum from The Cat Who… series by Lilian Jackson Braun
  18. Lipshen from The Witches by Roald Dahl
  19. Richard Parker from Life of Pi by Yann Martell
  20. The Cat in the Hat by Dr Seuss
  21. The cat who played the fiddle from Hey Diddle Diddle - an English nursery rhyme
  22. The Pussycat from The Owl and the Pussy-cat  by Edward Lear
  23. Three little kittens who lost their mittens - a Mother Goose Nursery Rhyme 
  24. Tom Kitten from The Tale of Tom Kitten by Beatrix Potter
  25. Skimbleshanks, Mr. Mistoffelees, Macavity and Old Deuteronomy! from Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by T.S. Eliot
  26. Behemoth from The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  27. Maurice from The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett
  28. Carbonel from Carbonel by Barbara Sleigh
  29. Noboru Wataya from The Wind Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami
  30. Greebo, You, and Ratbag from Discworld by Terry Pratchett

Please add your favourite fictonal felines in the comments section below.

If you liked this post, you'll love 20 Literary Quotes About Cats and Social Media Explained

 by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers Write,  The Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her onPinterestFacebookGoogle+Tumblr  and Twitter.  

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Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

Writers Write - Write to communicate

The Romantic Sub-Plot - Six Uncommon Romantic Love Interests

I recently wrote a post about the six sub-plots writers use most often in their stories.

The most common sub-plot is the love interest. As I said, a love interest does not have to be a romantic interest. It could be a friend, a pet, or a family member that your protagonist loves. Writers use love interests to support protagonists and to thwart them by threatening their well-being.

However, if you are going to use the romantic sub-plot for your story, i.e., a love interest who represents the romantic and sexual needs of your protagonist, I want to offer suggestions for making it more interesting. 

Too often, we get stuck with stereotypes. Sometimes it’s good to choose something quirky or different – maybe even a little grittier than usual. If you do choose one of these six, remember that it should suit your main character’s personality and sexuality. Don’t do it for shock value or because you are bored.

You could include one of these six less common options for your romantic sub-plot:

  1. A relationship that depends on a fetish or an addiction
  2. A non-straight relationship. Why should your hero be heterosexual? 
  3. A friend with benefits
  4. An on-again off-again relationship
  5. A strategically chosen lover for political or business purposes
  6. A damaged relationship that does not improve or change, for example, a bad marriage that staggers on instead of dying

Remember that sub-plots are there to advance your story and to expose your characters to forces that could transform them. They allow the reader to see protagonists in a different light. They allow protagonists to see themselves in a different light. 

I hope this post gave you a chance to think about using less ordinary romantic sub-plots.

If you enjoyed this post, you will love Six Sub-Plots That Add Style To Your Story and Torture your Character - The Three Most Effective Types of Inner Conflict

 by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers WriteThe Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her on PinterestFacebookGoogle+Tumblr  and Twitter.  

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Writers Write offers the best  writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to  news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

Writers Write - Write to communicate

Let’s talk dialogue – part three – Six ways emphasis can change meaning in dialogue

Most of us don’t speak in a continuous monotone. Even newsreaders have a slight lilt in their delivery. Nobody knows the value of a well-placed emphasis better than a teenage girl. (‘Oh, that’s sooo embarrassing!’). Did you notice how the italics were showing the emphasis there?

Catfight

OK, let’s imagine a group of girls at a party. Everything’s going well – the DJ’s playing One Direction, the boys are acting cool, the girls are dressed like the cast of Gossip Girl – when Tanya storms up to a girl named Chloe.
‘Did you say Keri slept with my boyfriend?’ Tanya demanded.

OMG! How does Chloe respond?

What meaning do you want to stress in your dialogue?

Let’s look at how an emphasis in italics affects the way we understand the dialogue – it even changes the possible meaning of Chloe’s response.

I never said she slept with your boyfriend,’ Chloe said.
     Meaning: Somebody else said she slept with him.

‘I never said she slept with your boyfriend,’ Chloe said.
     Meaning: How dare you accuse me of something like that?

‘I never said she slept with your boyfriend,’ Chloe said.
     Meaning: Someone else slept with him.

‘I never said she slept with your boyfriend,’ Chloe said.
     Meaning: She maybe just fooled around with him.

‘I never said she slept with your boyfriend,’ Chloe said.
     Meaning: She slept with someone else’s boyfriend.

‘I never said she slept with your boyfriend,’ Chloe said.
     Meaning: I just suspected she slept with him.

When else do we use italics in dialogue or in the narrative?

  1. When we want to isolate foreign words. Example: ‘Êtes-vous blessé?’ asked the French policeman.
  2. We can also use it for uncommon foreign words. Example: Her mother made a delicious tamatie bredie on a cold winter night.
  3. When we use the titles of books, TV shows or albums. Example:  Nigel was reading David Leavitt’s novel The Lost Language of Cranes. Or: Gina was listening to Madonna’s album Like A Prayer. However, if your character is reading a short story, we’d use quotation marks and it would probably look like this: Nigel was reading David Leavitt’s short story ‘Territory’ from his Family Dancing collection. And if your character were listening to a song, it would look like this: Gina was listening to the lead single, ‘Like A Prayer’, from Madonna’s album Like A Prayer.

Brands and the Bible

Of course, there’s always an exception to the rule. We don’t use italics or quote marks for most computer terms, brands or the Bible. Example: Timmy was eating Weetabix for breakfast. Or: David had to upgrade to a new version of Microsoft Windows.

If you enjoyed this post, you will love

 by Anthony Ehlers

Anthony Ehlers is a reluctant blogger. A child of the 70s, he’s a late converter to the (sometimes scary) world of social media. As a creative writing facilitator, he loves sharing ideas around storytelling and the blog post is another way to reach out to fellow writers no matter their stage of the journey. He always encourages delegates with energy, humour and his insights into novels, short stories and scriptwriting. He sometimes lurks on Facebook and flits on to a branch of Twitter  when his Inbox is empty (which isn’t a lot these days). 

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Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.
Writers Write - Write to communicate

How To Avoid ‘Telling’ Words

At the end of last year I wrote a post titled Five Incredibly Simple Ways to Help Writers Show and Not Tell. This week I want to discuss Tip 4 - Avoid Telling Words - in more detail. 

‘Just write’ is some of the best advice I have ever received. Forget about the rules and write your heart out. Write until your fingers bleed and the story drips onto the page. Then you write some more. For your first draft, that is what you do. Explore. Experiment. 

When it gets to your second draft, you will start looking for the obvious mistakes. You may have too much white space. Yes, it can happen. What about ‘talking heads’? Too much talking and not enough body language and setting interaction to ground your characters. Perhaps you have started with back-story? Go back, find your inciting moment and put it in the beginning. 

This is also when you will start looking for instances where you are telling instead of showing. This will become easier and occur less the more you practice. Look out for the words ‘was and were’, ‘have and had’ for example. You should only use them for the verb to be, but most of the time they are making you tell. Verbs can also make you do this. Look at this post on more telling words to avoid.

Look at Example 1:

Arthur was furious. He was supposed to be going home. Instead, he was staying behind in the office, at six, on a Friday to do everyone else’s job. He had asked so many times. He had pleaded with them to empty their trashcans on a Friday before they left, but they never did. He was so upset. They were so irresponsible. Didn’t they realise what a risk it was? He was using his plastic gloves and wearing his mask and still he was shuddering as he was emptying yet another full wastebasket into the black bag. Did they even know how many germs were festering in the bins? They thought they could rely on the cleaning services, but the cleaning services were only coming in on Mondays.

Now, consider Example 2:

Arthur glared at the clock as it tick-tocked its way to six o’clock. The weekend loomed ahead. His footsteps echoed through the deserted office as he huffed over to the nearest wall and read the sign again: 

Empty your bin 
Germs are a sin 
Disease will spread
And we will all be dead

That was perfectly clear? Surely, no one could underestimate the importance of office hygiene? He even made it rhyme to help his colleagues remember it better. 

He stomped to the nearest desk, snapped on his gloves and positioned his mask over his mouth before he shook open the big black bag with a flourish. Carefully, he picked up the contaminated bin and emptied the vile rubbish into the black bag. Everyone knew the cleaners only worked on Mondays. He could almost hear the bacteria multiplying as he tied the bag and snapped off his gloves. The mask he would keep on just in case. 

Source for comic

Analysis

It is clear that poor, old Arthur has more problems than just telling, but let’s look at the biggest differences between the two paragraphs. 

  1. ‘Arthur was furious’. This is classic telling. Use a nice strong verb instead, in this case glared. If, for example I wanted show that Arthur was happy, I could write ‘Arthur whistled as he walked down the corridor or he winked and shot his finger pistol at the receptionist as he walked past.’
  2. I used the senses tick-tocked, echoed, and huffed. These all created images in your mind. 
  3. I had some fun creating the sign. It also helped to convey the extent of his obsession. To say he asked so many times, just means he is a nag. In the second example, there is no doubt about how batty this guy is. 
  4. By showing him putting on his gloves and mask and making him shake open the bag I hoped to establish a sense of drama and of routine. He has done this before. He came prepared. As opposed to saying: not again. 
  5. The repetition of the word ‘snapped’ was deliberate. I wanted you to know that he took this very seriously. The snapping was part of his routine. 
  6. By ‘hearing’ the bacteria he also shows us his paranoia. 
  7. I just had to send him out into the world with his mask on. He is a bit of a nut job after all. 

It is so easy to fall into the telling trap, but keep practising. The showing will show up eventually.

[Remember that there are times when you should tell and not show. Follow the link to read more: Five instances when you need to tell (and not show)]

 by Mia Botha

If you enjoyed this post, you will love:

  1. Five Incredibly Simple Ways To Help Writers Show And Not Tell 
  2. How To Use The Senses To Show And Not Tell
  3. How Choosing a Viewpoint Character Helps You Show And Not Tell
  4. How Being Specific Helps You Show And Not Tell

Mia Botha facilitates for Writers Write. She is also a novelist, a ghost writer, and the winner of the Mills&Boon Voice of Africa Competition. When she isn’t writing, she is the mother of two children and the wife of a very lucky man. Follow Mia on Pinterest and Facebook and Tumblr and Twitter

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    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    The Seven Points You Need To Build A Story For Your Business

    Storytelling for Business

    Every time you have something important to talk about in your business, you should be telling your audience a story. People forget statistics and names and events, but they never forget stories. A story is the only way we can activate the parts of the brain that get listeners to relate to us.

    Once we understand the power of stories and accept the need for them in our businesses, we need to learn how to tell them. One of the easiest ways to do this is by using a plot.

    What, exactly, is a plot?

    A plot for a business story usually involves a brand (or a business or a person) and a competitor (or a problem of some kind). All stories need an inciting moment – a moment where something happens that requires the brand to act or to react. When this happens, the brand has to set a new goal. This new goal usually causes upheaval, involves planning and requires change. A story is born from the brand’s reactions to these events.

    To make your business story exciting, you need to employ storytelling techniques.

    In all good stories:

    1. The brand has to achieve a goal or face negative consequences if it does not
    2. There is conflict between the brand and the competitor/problem
    3. A plot requires that a brand changes or learns something or improves

    When your brand has a goal, it is able to drive a story. Until then you have an idea. A brand’s motivations and emotions engage your customers and move the story forward.

    Source

    The Seven Points You Need To Write A Story For Your Business

    1. Begin with a bang. Start when something meaningful happens. Examples: Your brand needs to launch a product; a leader has resigned; you are facing a staffing or environmental crisis; or your brand wants to edge ahead of a competitor.
    2. Wants, Needs, Setbacks. Two key elements in storytelling are motivation and conflict. Whichever story you are telling, you need to show the conflict the problem has produced and why your brand is motivated to move forward. Use dialogue. Use emotions. Use the senses.
    3. Goals and Challenges. Your brand has to want to achieve its goals and be prepared to overcome challenges. You should show (not tell) how your brand is coping, how it is finding solutions and what it plans to do.
    4. Embrace the fear. What is your brand most at risk, or afraid, of losing? Customer Satisfaction? Customer Loyalty? Money? Status? Reputation? Use this fear in your story. Tell your readers that these things are important to your brand. Use them to create empathy with your readers.
    5. Tell a story. Tell us what happened in a short series of scenes with a clear beginning, middle, and end. Tip: When you brainstorm, start your story with ‘Once upon a time…’ Use the story outline as the basis for your finished story. 
    6. And just when it couldn’t get any worse… All great (and small) stories need a Dark Night of the Soul. Try to create a moment when things look impossibly bleak for your brand. 
    7. The end. Then show us how your brand resolves it.

    If you want to improve your business writing skills, join us for The Plain Language Programme. Email news@writerswrite.co.za  for details.

    © Amanda Patterson

    If you enjoyed this article, read these posts:

    1. 93 Extremely Bad Business Writing Habits to Break
    2. Nine Things To Avoid When You Write A Report
    3. Begin at the end - the one essential email trick every business writer should know
    4. The Top Seven Tips for Writing Emails
    5. Persuasive Writing Brainstormer Template
     by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers WriteThe Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her on Pinterest, Facebook, Google+, Tumblr  and Twitter.  

    ~~~~~

    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    The Top 50 Writing Blogs of 2015

    Bryan Hutchinson from Positive Writer has announced the Top 50 Writing Blogs of 2015.

    We are thrilled that Writers Write is one of them. Thank you for reading our posts and we hope that we continue to inspire, educate and entertain writers.

    We must thank our contributors, Amanda PattersonMia Botha, and Anthony Ehlers who make sure that we always have excellent content to post.

    If you missed this post, read The Writers Write Top 42 Writing Posts of 2014, which were essentially what put us in the Top 50. 

    P.S. We were also named one of the 13 Great Facebook Pages for Writers

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    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, email news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    February 2015 - In Writing


    Meet Barbara Kingsolver at Writers Write in Johannesburg, 10 February 2015.

    Courses in February and March 2015

    Course

    Description

    Dates

    Writers Write

    How to Write a Book

    2-5 February

    Writers Write

    How to Write a Book

    7,14,21,28 February

    Writers Write

    How to Write a Book

    9-12 March

    Writers Write

    How to write a Book

    7,14,21,28 March

    The Plain Language Programme

    Advanced Business Writing

    17-18 February

    The Plain Language Programme

    Advanced Business Writing

    17-18 March

    The Social Brand

    How to write for Social Media

    27 February

    Kids etc.

    How to write Children’s Books

    1 March

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    If you want more details on any of these, please email news@writerswrite.co.za

    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    Social Media Explained

    Have you ever thought of using #Caturday for your business. Or #throwbackthursdays?

    "If content is the king of Social Media, consistency is the queen. It's about showing up when you say you will. It is a challenge when life intrudes, but there are ways to make it easier for you. Planning your posts a week or a month ahead helps. Categories and themes are all great ways to simplify your content." ~Mia Botha, How to plan your blogging week in less than 15 minutes

    Source for Image

    Writing for social media is all about engaging your audience, and showing your personality. It is a fun and effective way to talk about your business on your blog. If you communicate well on your networks, you will be successful.

    Writers Write has more than 300 000 followers on social media. More than 80% of our business is generated via these platforms. If you want to find out more, join us for The Social Brand, our social media workshop on 27 February 2015.

    News Alert Writers Write has been announced as one of the Top 50 Writing Blogs of 2015. We were also named one of the 13 Great Facebook Pages for Writers

    (If you liked this post, you'll love 30 (or so) Famous Fictional Cats and  20 Literary Quotes About Cats)

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    Join us on Facebook 

    and Twitter

    Follow @Writers_Write

    and Pinterest

    Pinterest

    and LinkedIn

    LinkedIn

    and Google+

    Google+

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    If you enjoyed this post read:

    1. Social networks need a ‘constant gardener’ to grow and sustain them
    2. The Most Important Lesson for Building a Social Media Following - Being There
    3. Three Top Tips for Writing for Social Media
    4. Eight Invaluable Blogging Tips for Writers
    5. 40 Twitter Hashtags for Writers
    6. Seven ways to make the most of social media
    7. Six reasons social media matters to your company
    8. Effective Internet Writing
    9. Throwback Thursdays Mean Business

     by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers WriteThe Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her on PinterestFacebook,  Google+,  Tumblr  and  Twitter.  


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    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    Five Really Good Reasons To Outline Your Novel - before you write a word

    Outlining isn't a necessity, but there are so many advantages to it that even die-hard 'pantsters' should think twice about rejecting it. I have taught hundreds of people to write and 90% of those authors who finish writing their books have used an outline of some sort. Most of the authors I’ve interviewed also use outlines. 

    Outlines can be: 50-page detailed plans; a simple series of index cards with a list of characters, major scenes, and sequels; structured timelines; a series of character questionnaires showing development, motivations, flaws and strengths; story maps; or one-page synopses. Outlining does not mean that you have to put in every detail. (Note: There are some outliners who do include everything.) It does mean that you have a map to help you navigate and finish a first draft. 

    Some authors have plotted their stories for decades in their heads, making notes in journals. As George RR Martin, creator of A Song of Fire and Ice says: 

      All the major things have been planned since the beginning, since the early 90s, the major deaths and the general direction of things. Obviously, the details and the minor things have been things that I've discovered along the way, part of the fun of writing the books is making these discoveries along the journey. But the general structure of the books has been in my head all along. 

    Source for Outlining Methods

    Here are five advantages tor outlining your novel before you start: 

    1. There is very little chance of writer’s block. Getting stuck in a rut or losing the plot are the most common reasons people join our course. They have tried the ‘pantser’ method and failed. None of these writers have outlined or worried about whether they have a plot that is strong enough to see them through. Once they join Writers Write, and work out that they need a plan, they are much happier and mostly more successful. If you get stuck, you simply look at the outline and move on.
    2. You reduce the number of rewrites and edits. Outlining is similar, in many ways, to a first draft. If you spend time planning the book, you will have already written at least one rough draft before you start on the manuscript. You will also be able to write more quickly because you have a plan. The freedom of having an outline allows you to be more creative when you’re writing scenes. You can use your writing skills to craft the story instead of frantically trying to think about what happens next.
    3. You spot problem areas before you begin. It is easy to write yourself and your characters into impossible situations. It might be fun, but you may have to scrap an entire book and begin again if you can’t write yourself out of it.
    4. It improves creativity. By thinking everything through and planning your story you’re stimulating the creative process. Even if you write the first draft without referring to your outline, you will have a head start with your story. You will also be able to thread ideas through the story and to foreshadow more effectively. You can’t foreshadow if you don’t know what is going to happen next.
    5. You can develop compelling characters with clear story goals. This allows you to imagine how your character will develop over the course of the story. Because you know what happens, his or her arc will never be out of step with the rest of the manuscript. 

    What do you have to lose by outlining? Very little. In more than 10 years of teaching, I have never had students say that it has made their writing worse. Most of them are grateful that they do not have to waste more time on books that fall flat. 

    If you enjoyed this post, read 

    1. Six Sub-Plots That Add Style To Your Story 
    2. Five guaranteed ways to bore your reader
    3. The Author’s Promise - two things every writer should do
    4. What is the difference between a commercial and a literary plot?
    5. The Top 10 Tips for Plotting and Finishing a Book
     by Amanda Patterson. Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Her signature courses are Writers WriteThe Plain Language Programme, and The Social Brand. Follow her on Pinterest, Facebook,  Google+,  Tumblr  and  Twitter.  

    ~~~~~

    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate

    Text © Amanda Patterson

    Let’s talk dialogue – part two – Do you say it out loud or keep it to yourself?

    Last week I wrote about How to shape and structure spoken words. This week I want to talk about how interior thought works with dialogue.

    We live in the age of the ‘over-share’. On meeting someone for the first time, do we blurt out things better left private – our love life, medical history or religious and political beliefs?

    An example of TMI (Too Much Information) is perhaps a great way to show how spoken dialogue and interior thought works in fiction. 

    Out of your character’s mouth

    Imagine that a character – let’s call him Clement – is going for a job interview.

      ‘I really can’t stay too long,’ Clement said. ‘My mom’s waiting in the car for me. You see, I don’t have my own car.’
      The recruiter looked up from her clipboard. ‘We should be finished in a few minutes.’
      ‘She doesn’t like it when I’m late,’ he went on. ‘I know I should stand up to her. My therapist says I should be more assertive. What do you think?’
      She smiled. ‘I think respecting your mother is important.’

    In the above example, the words were spoken by the characters – out loud, and Clement and the recruiter could hear each other. As writers, we show this by using inverted commas or quotation marks.

    What's going on in her head?

    Now, let’s imagine the recruiter – let’s call her Karen – in the above example has some serious doubts about Clement as a candidate – but she won’t share these with him. She’ll keep them to herself. This is what it could look like.

      Karen looked at the candidate opposite her. This one looks like a loser, she thought. Why do I always get stuck with the freaks?
      ‘I really can’t stay too long,’ he said. ‘My mom’s waiting in the car for me. You see, I don’t have my own car.’
      Karen looked up from her clipboard. ‘We should be finished in a few minutes.’ And so will your chances of ever getting this job.
      ‘She doesn’t like it when I’m late,’ he went on. ‘I know I should stand up to her. My therapist says I should be more assertive. What do you think?’
      She smiled. ‘I think respecting your mother is important.’ Especially if you’re Norman Bates.

    In this example, the words in italics are Karen’s thought. Sometimes called interior thought, it’s the private voice inside your character’s head. You don’t have to use the italics to show interior dialogue or speech, but it’s a nice way to make it stand out.

    When we write, we should find a consistent way to show the spoken dialogue and the interior thoughts of our characters, so that the reader never becomes confused.

    If you enjoyed this post, you will love Let’s talk dialogue – how to shape and structure spoken words.

     by Anthony Ehlers

    Anthony Ehlers is a reluctant blogger. A child of the 70s, he’s a late converter to the (sometimes scary) world of social media. As a creative writing facilitator, he loves sharing ideas around storytelling and the blog post is another way to reach out to fellow writers no matter their stage of the journey. He always encourages delegates with energy, humour and his insights into novels, short stories and scriptwriting. He sometimes lurks on Facebook and flits on to a branch of Twitter  when his Inbox is empty (which isn’t a lot these days).

    ~~~~~

    Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

    Writers Write - Write to communicate