How Long Should Your Blog Post Be?

Eight Tips For Writing Posts People Want To Read

How Long Should Your Blog Post Be?

This is a question I have asked and people have asked me when I teach The Social Brand. I have Googled it and Googled it again. The answers are wide and varied. 

The most definitive answers are outdated, because Google changes their algorithms 500-600 times a year. Some changes are minor and some are game changers.

One of the biggest changes was when content trumped SEO (Search Engine Optimisation). Changing the algorithms meant that SEO was no longer the most important consideration. You need frequently-updated, good-quality original content to rank higher. 

Your SERP (Search Engine Ranking Page) is influenced by these algorithms. Previously all you had to do was ensure that your tags were well done and then you were fine. Now, content trumps the tags, but how much content?

In some of the articles, 250 words is considered too short, but again and again the experts state that content trumps word count. Seth Godin is brilliant at short posts - 200 words is a long post for him. 

I decided to look at the lengths of articles that our readers enjoyed. Below is a table of our Writers Write Top 42 posts for 2014. I have included the word count and the number of views in 2014. 

Ranking

Post

Views

Word Count

1.       

45 ways to avoid using the word 'very'

1,361,105

Table

2.       

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

325,064

Table

3.       

 Eight Commonly Misused Words

57,221

Infographic

4.       

 The Five Elements of a Story

34,971

Infographic

5.       

 Persuasive Writing - Emotional vs Intellectual Words

32,935

Infographic

6.       

15 Questions Authors Should Ask Characters

31,351

294

7.       

The Locked Room – A simple way to test your plot

26,559

386

8.       

Five Incredibly Simple Ways to Help Writers Show and Not Tell

22,196

596

9.       

The Importance of Inciting Moments

18,733

724

10.    

50 Lyric Titles As Writing Prompts

17,004

561

11.    

The 12 Question Fiction Writing Conflict Test

14,036

Table

12.    

The Six Defining Characteristics of Strong Female Protagonists

11,717

704

13.    

10 Things Successful Authors Do

11,154

586

14.    

Universal Needs - Creating Characters

10,546

Infographic

15.    

How to write a one-page synopsis

9,659

Infographic

16.    

An Editing Checklist For Writers

9,554

Infographic

17.    

10 Short Story Competitions To Enter Before The End Of 2014

9,506

List of links

18.    

What does it take to write a book? The five qualities published authors share

9,472

624

19.    

Know Your Dashes

9,366

Infographic

20.    

Confessions of a Serial Killer- How to kill characters when you write

9,352

587

21.    

Character Questionnaire - How well do you know your hero?

8,901

List

22.    

10 (Amazingly Simple) Tips to Get You Back on The Writing Track

8,858

806

23.    

Which one of these is your favourite writing position?

8,411

Image

24.    

The Top 42 Writing Posts of 2013

8,400

List of links

25.    

Psychopath or Sociopath - What's the difference?

8,361

Infographic

26.    

Which famous writer's style is most like your own?

8,031

Link

27.    

How the five senses make stories seem real

7,721

588

28.    

Types of Love - Creating Characters

7,580

Infographic

29.    

The 25 Best Quotes About Authors

7,563

743

30.    

21 Literary Quotes on Beginnings, Middles, and Endings

7,379

607

31.    

Five guaranteed ways to bore your reader

7,104

536

32.    

A Fabulous Resource for Writers - 350 Character Traits

7,087

Table

33.    

Punctuation Personality Types - Which one are you?

7,034

Infographic

34.    

10 Things You Didn't Know About JK Rowling

6,768

265

35.    

Seven Extremely Good Reasons to Write the Ending First

6,730

670

36.    

Seven Essential Things to Remember about Very Important Characters

6,486

323

37.    

Why you need strong verbs when you write

6,400

Infographic

38.    

20 words used to describe specific tastes and flavours

6,304

321

39.    

17 Ways To Make your Novel More Memorable

6,267

671

40.    

Writing About Characters With Phobias

6,201

Infographic

41.    

How to make your characters shockingly real

6,023

402

42.    

Examples of Character Archetypes

6,014

Infographic


It is interesting to note that many of our top posts are infographics. (It is important to remember that these were once articles made up of words.) This tells you what kind of information readers are looking for. 

The posts that aren’t infographics average around 500 words. Not one of our popular posts is over 1000 words. I prefer short posts. Most people start waffling or repeating information if they write too much. 


Eight Tips For Writing Posts People Read
  1. Content is king. Find and identify topics that interest you. 
  2. Simplify the content as much as possible. Use a visual form if you can. This site - Piktochart - allows you to create your own infographics. 
  3. Use one topic per post. If you need to write more, rather write a series instead of making your post too long.
  4. Pack a punch with your writing. Use strong nouns and verbs. 
  5. Cut the flab: reduce modifiers, qualifiers adverbs and adjectives. 
  6. Use the inverted pyramid of media writing. We have a short attention span especially on the internet or in fiction speak: Don’t start with backstory.
  7. Read and follow as many successful blogs as you can. Take a look at their best posts and try to identify what worked. 
  8. Make sure to tag keywords in your posts for SEO, but focus on as much new, good quality content as possible  
    In short, don't focus on the length of your post. Focus on the quality of your content, that is until Google makes another change. 

    Happy blogging.

    If you want to learn how to write for social media or how to write a book, email news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

     by Mia Botha

    If you enjoyed this post, you will love:

    1. Social Media Chill Pill - 15 Top Tips For Writers On Social Media
    2. Dealing with deadlines - Five tips to keep you on track
    3. A Writer's Friends - how to build an author platform

    Mia Botha facilitates for Writers Write. She is also a novelist, a ghost writer, and the winner of the Mills&Boon Voice of Africa Competition. When she isn’t writing, she is the mother of two children and the wife of a very lucky man. Follow Mia on Pinterest  and Facebook and  Tumblr  and  Twitter.

    ~~~~~

      Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

      Writers Write - Write to communicate

      The Truth About Memoirs — Six Ways To Write A Memoir

      Continuing my series of posts on The Truth About Memoirs, I want to talk about ways in which you can tell your stories.


      1.   Interior Monologue
      • We overhear the memoirist’s unedited and uninhibited inner thoughts. We are intimate trespassers.
      • We follow her stream of consciousness, dreams, inner life and experiences.
      • The memoirist can express feelings, fears, prejudices that she wouldn’t share with another. 
      • Vicarious experience, intimate and close to the reader.
      Example:
      I can’t shake the memory of mother on my wedding day, the smell of vodka on her breath as she kissed me, the way she held my hand until it hurt, the look in her eyes, like she was an animal and I was abandoning her. Like Dad. Like Jena. It’s a persistent vision, like closing your eyes in bright light and seeing a kaleidoscope imprinted on the back of your eyelids.

      2.   Dramatic Monologue
      • We hear the memoirist speaking to the reader; we are addressed as a captive but passive audience.
      • She is having a one-side dialogue with the reader.
      • The memoirist is telling us what’s on her mind, drawing us into her world.
      Example:
      Most of us have mothers who bake cookies and drive us to after school piano teacher. Not my mother let me tell you. She drank vodka in her orange juice in the morning. She slept with my Matric dance date. She made my sister Jena sign an affidavit to assure our mother that her virginity was intact. Don’t think I’m making this up. Ask my Dad—he stayed until I was twelve and left. On my wedding day, she showed up like Elizabeth Taylor on a movie set.

      3.   Letter /Email Narration
      • Letters or emails are dialogue at a distance.
      • The memoirist is speaking to another character for a certain reason.
      • The second character can narrate his or her own letters back.
      • Sometimes the memoirist is writing about rather than to another character for whatever reason.
      • It can be a voyeuristic and intimate experience for the reader, privy to private thoughts and information between two or more people.
      Example:
      Dear Jena
      I know you say you have not spoken to Mom since my wedding day, but I’m writing to tell you that she’s been up to her old tricks again. This is going to be a shock to you, sis, but she has signed herself out of rehab and got married to a man who could be our younger brother. Someone says he looks a bit like Dad. Men, vodka, emotional rollercoasters—this was always our childhood wasn’t it? She had the merciful blackouts and we were left with the memories.


      4.   Diary Entries
      • In a diary, the memoirist reacts to events as they happen.
      • The diary gives structure to a memoir, as opposed to mere stream of consciousness or casualness of a letter.
      • The audience is the diary itself and the reader; it creates intimacy at a remove – the reader is not addressed directly, but allowed into the memoirist’s story via the diary.
      Example:
      12 July
      Today I got a call from Mom. (Note to self: Don’t answer Blocked calls again!) She wanted money. What’s new? She wanted me to help sign her out of rehab. I said no. She cried and I felt nothing. Nothing. It’s easier than feeling the other stuff—pain, anger, guilt. I don’t understand how Jena can leave me to deal with this on my own. She can say she’s cut herself off from Mom’s ‘toxic influence’ but why must I wear the emotional HazMat suit? It was a long day at the office and I didn’t need her Vodka-hoarse voice on the other side of the line.

      5.   Detached Autobiography
      • The memoirist is telling her story after it has happened, about what happened in the past – this distance gives the narrative a coolness.
      • She is now in a frame of mind that’s changed since the event happened; she has changed a lot and has learned something from it.
      • Often it has been another person in her life’s journey that has brought about this change and this other person features strongly in the story. It can be an animal too.
      Example:
      In July 1989, I had been married for three months and I’d been promoted to senior editor at Vantage House. It was the coldest winter Johannesburg had known. It was also the year my mother entered a rehab clinic for alcohol dependency. She was fifty-five years old and finally had a name for her disease. I was thirty-two and I had no neat label for my own disease. It would take me another ten years to learn to forgive her.

      6.   Observer Memoir
      • The memoir is an observer in the story, giving the reader a report of what’s happened not just to her – but also to someone else or her family or a group.
      • Another person takes a major part in the action and dominates the story.
      • This technique creates a comfortable distance for the reader to absorb the memoir.
      • This technique allows the memoirist to frame and moderate the memoir so it reads like a non-fiction novel. 
      Example:
      The moment she walked in through the doors, I could tell that she was drunk. When Katherine Smith walked into the ballroom of the Morrell Hotel, every eye was on her. She wore a white designer dress that increased her radiance like a spotlight on a movie set. She had that kind of beauty, a charm that was an electric web. It was only when you got to close, caught in those china-blue eyes, mesmerised by her smile, that husky voice, that you realised she was dangerous. And by then, it was too late. That day, there was nothing anyone could do. It was my wedding day and Katherine Smith was my mother.

      If you want to learn how to write a book send an email to  news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

         by Anthony Ehlers

        If you enjoyed this post, read:

        Anthony Ehlers is a reluctant blogger. A child of the 70s, he’s a late converter to the (sometimes scary) world of social media. As a creative writing facilitator, he loves sharing ideas around storytelling and the blog post is another way to reach out to fellow writers no matter their stage of the journey. He always encourages delegates with energy, humour and his insights into novels, short stories and scriptwriting. He sometimes lurks on Facebook and flits on to a branch of Twitter  when his Inbox is empty (which isn’t a lot these days).

        ~~~~~

        Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

        Writers Write - Write to communicate.

        Four Ways To Create An Authentic Social Media Presence


        Finding each other

        You take too large a swig of lemony water. The waiter hovers as you straighten your cutlery for the umpteenth time. His dating profile, as amazing as it was, didn’t have a picture, so you scan the bustling restaurant again for the pink shirt. A man clears his throat behind you. Paul! You turn to face him. Your smile freezes. He’s short. He’s bald. He has yellow sweat stains under the arms of his crumpled salmon shirt. And what looks like runny egg in his wiry beard.

        To date, or not to date

        Branding is a lot like the info that goes on an online dating profile. It’s a specific image about who you are that helps differentiate you from others. It’s your identity – the personality you portray to the world out there. If you’re a company, it’s what attracts your customers to try your product or service. If you’re an author, it’s what gets potential readers interested in you. It’s what gets you your first date. 

        I’m outta here

        Nothing makes a customer or potential fan say ‘I’m outta here’ faster than when the personality you portray on social media is nothing like who you really are.

        These four tips will help you create a social media presence that is authentic, congruent, and resonates with your audience:
        1. Stay true to your personality: if your company were a character in a novel, what kind of person would it be? As a writer, what is your personality? Don’t portray a social media presence that departs from who you are in ‘real life’. 
        2. Stay true to your accomplishments: don’t brag about things you want to do. Show what you’ve done. It adds credibility to your brand. 
        3. Stay true to your values: your values are the ‘why’ behind what you do what you do. Before you communicate your values on social media, you need to know what they are. You need to be able to describe them in specific, concrete language.
        4. Stay true to your interests: our interests are part of what makes people curious about us. What are your company’s or your interests? If you let this human aspect shine through in your social media presence, it will help your customers or readers relate to you. 
        Here’s to that next date. 

        If you want to learn how to write for social media, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.
         by Donna Radley

        If you enjoyed this post, read Three Ways To Take The Twit Out Of Twitter

        Donna is a creative writer who has tinkered with words for years. She has written newsletters and online articles, translated a book, and edited a variety of documents. She also reviews books. She owned her own training business and now facilitates The Plain Language Programme for Writers Write. She is currently working on her novel, which involves drinking lots of sweet tea. You can view her profile on LinkedIn or follow her on Twitter.  

        ~~~~~

        Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

        Writers Write - Write to communicate

        Spelling Tips and Tricks – Making Words Plural

        Source: All About Learning Press

        If you enjoyed this infographic, you may like:

        1. The Possessive Apostrophe S
        2. 22 Commonly Confused Adjectives
        3. An Editing Checklist For Writers
        4. Transitional Words and Phrases - Three reasons to use them
        5. 12 of the Most Misused English Words

        ~~~~~

        Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

        Writers Write - Write to communicate

        Famous Authors Insulting Other Authors

        Being insulted as an author by one of your peers must be disconcerting. Writers are experts at making words count. However, there aren't that many modern authors who cause waves. 

        • There is Martin Amis who claimed he would need brain damage to write children’s books. 
        • Harold Bloom said, "How to read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone? Why, very quickly, to begin with, and perhaps also to make an end. Why read it? Presumably, if you cannot be persuaded to read anything better, Rowling will have to do." 
        • Bret Easton Ellis said, "Saint David Foster Wallace: a generation trying to read him feels smart about themselves which is part of the whole bullshit package." 
        • Stephen King referred to Stephenie Meyer's Twilight as "tweenager porn".
        • Peter James based a character named Amis Smallbone, a villain with a tiny penis, in Not Dead Yet, on Martin Amis after an unpleasant altercation with that author.

        But most of the best insults are from authors who are long dead. We hope you enjoy this selection.

        Source for Infographic: AussieWriter

        ~~~~~

         by Amanda Patterson. Follow her on PinterestFacebook,  Google+,  Tumblr  and Twitter. 

        If you enjoyed this post, read these:
        ~~~~~

        Writers Write
         offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

        Writers Write - Write to communicate

        37 Ways To Write About Anger

        We all get angry. It is natural and it can be a good thing. When it is uncontrolled or unnecessary, anger will not do us any favours on either a personal or a social level. 

        The same is true for the characters we create. When we write about angry characters, we should remember that there is always something behind this emotion. Anger is usually a surface emotion. It is a reaction to an underlying problem.  

        A)  Motivation

        We usually become angry when we feel:
        1. confused
        2. frustrated
        3. hurt
        4. jealous 
        5. embarrassed
        6. powerless
        7. rejected
        8. worried
        When our characters are feeling this way, we should incorporate it into our story.

        B)  Body Language

        Physical signs of anger include:
        1. an increased heart rate
        2. feeling hot or flushed
        3. shaking
        4. a clenched jaw
        5. a dry mouth
        6. shouting, ranting, making loud noises
        7. staring
        8. baring teeth
        9. finding it difficult to hear
        10. tense muscles
        C)  Passive or Aggressive - How angry is your character?

        We generally express anger in two ways.
        1. We withdraw – passive behaviour
        2. We lash out – aggressive behaviour
        Being passively angry can be as destructive as being aggressively angry.

        D)   Ways to create conflict

        Seven ways a character can show passive anger:  
        1. Being defeatist. Examples: underachieving, choosing to repeat a proven failed behaviour pattern, being accident-prone.
        2. Being secretive. Examples: anonymous complaints, gossiping, conning.
        3. With dispassion. Examples: giving the cold shoulder, the silent treatment, substance abuse, talking about emotions without showing any, oversleeping, playing with electronic equipment or machines.
        4. Evasion. Examples: avoiding conflict, becoming phobic.
        5. Exhibiting obsessive behaviour. Examples: overeating or dieting too much, obsessively tidying up.
        6. Manipulation. Examples: provoking bad behaviour in others, playing the victim, emotional blackmail, feigning illness, using other people to deliver negative messages.
        7. Self-Blame. Examples: apologising for everything, criticizing their own behaviour, inviting criticism.
        Source: Savage Chickens

        Seven ways a character can show aggressive anger  
        1. Behaving manically. Examples: speaking, moving, and driving too quickly; overworking; spending too much money.
        2. Being physically destructive. Examples: vandalism, reckless driving, substance abuse, harming animals.
        3. Being selfish. Examples: being unpredictable, ignoring other people’s feelings and needs, ignoring requests for help.
        4. Being vengeful. Examples: holding a grudge, planning to hurt someone. 
        5. Bullying. Examples: making threats, persecuting, misusing power, shouting, explosive rages over small problems, illogical arguments.
        6. Physically or psychologically hurting people. Examples: sexual abuse, verbal abuse, ignoring people’s feelings, punishing people, making inappropriate jokes, being vulgar, blaming people for something they did not do.
        7. Showing off. Examples: talking over other people, throwing money around, acting as if you are better than someone else is, lying about achievements.

        E)  The Importance of Anger in Plotting

        As a writer, you can use anger in many ways:
        1. You can force a confrontation that moves the plot forward. A character may use it as a catalyst that allows an escape from an unhealthy relationship.
        2. You can reveal another side to a character that nobody dreamt existed. The mild-mannered man who nobody suspects of domestic violence could be revealed with an angry outburst.
        3. You can also use it as a transformative experience. A character who has reacted angrily to an event could regret it and choose to change his or her behaviour. 
        How do your important characters deal with anger?

        Source for examples of passive and aggressive anger

          © Amanda Patterson

          If you enjoyed this articleyou will love:

          Amanda is the founder of Writers Write. Follow her on  Pinterest,  Facebook,  Google+,  Tumblr  and Twitter. 

          ~~~~~

          Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

          Writers Write - Write to communicate

          The Truth About Memoirs – Is Yours A Brave Confession Or A Book Of Lies?

          Last week I started my series of posts on memoirs with The truth about memoirs – what took you off the desire line? This week I want to talk about secrets and lies.


          There’s a risk to telling the truth. I was struck by the backlash against Mackenzie Phillips when she published her controversial memoir about her road back from addiction and her dangerously incestuous relationship with her famous father, the founder of the Mamas and Papas. Journalists and bloggers slammed her; many in her own family publicly denounced her.  Was she telling the truth?

          Pandora’s Box

          When facilitating Secrets of a Memoirist, many new writers clam up when they realise they’re exposed to this risk. The risk includes:
          • being called a liar
          • hurting people you love
          • exposing yourself to public ridicule or humiliation
          • putting your life in danger (it can happen!)
          These are all risks we want to avoid, but I believe what holds us back is something more common: fear. There’s a saying: ‘you’re only as sick as your secrets’.  Writing a memoir is about revealing your secrets in a way that is irrevocable. Once the lid on Pandora’s Box is open, you can’t take anything back. It’s out there forever.

          Writing a memoir is not like keeping a journal.  A journal is private; it’s a place for you to have a conversation with yourself. A memoir is having a conversation with a reader – perhaps you want to give them hope, warn them about something, amuse or titillate them, or even offer them a vicarious glimpse into a new experience.

          Secrets and Lies

          Here are some reasons you might not tell the truth:
          • You only have ‘half the story’: so your memoir lacks information.
          • You have not recognised your own emotional ‘blind spots’ – maybe you’re fooling yourself.
          • You have internalised an inherited or second-hand story as you own experience.
          • You don’t remember a lot of it.

          The Test

          As a memoirist, you need to be aware of your intentions and the risk. If you’re writing to take revenge on someone or a group – as Truman Capote did in his roman à clef Answered Prayers – just remember they may bite back. Publishing his thinly disguised non-fiction novel played a part in Capote’s destruction.

          If you’re writing your story because you have feel you have a right to claim – or reclaim ¬¬– your identity, dignity, or your own broken past, then write and write fearlessly. A memoir is cathartic; it’s a way of taking back your power.  I think that’s what Mackenzie Phillips was trying to do.

          Your Truth and Nothing but Your Truth

          Keep in mind: you’re not a witness; you only need to tell your truth. If you’re comfortable with your own truth – something you feel deep inside you to be your own experience and memory – then you have nothing to worry about.

          While some people may violently disagree with you when your book is published, others will see you as brave, vulnerable, and honest. 

          Look out for next week’s blog on memoir.

          If you want to learn how to write a book send an email to  news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

             by Anthony Ehlers

            If you enjoyed this post, read:

            Anthony Ehlers is a reluctant blogger. A child of the 70s, he’s a late converter to the (sometimes scary) world of social media. As a creative writing facilitator, he loves sharing ideas around storytelling and the blog post is another way to reach out to fellow writers no matter their stage of the journey. He always encourages delegates with energy, humour and his insights into novels, short stories and scriptwriting. He sometimes lurks on Facebook and flits on to a branch of Twitter  when his Inbox is empty (which isn’t a lot these days).

            ~~~~~

            Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

            Writers Write - Write to communicate.

            April 2015 - In Writing


            Courses in April 2015

            Writers Write

            How to Write a Book

            20-23 April

            The Social Brand

            Social Media Workshop

            16 April

            The Plain Language Programme

            Advanced Business Writing

            9-10 April (Cape Town)

            Demystifying Self-Publishing 

            Self-Publishing Breakfast
            18 April


            Guest Speaker - 18 April 2015. Meet our special guest speaker, Per Ostberg, who will talk about his self-publishing journey at our Writers Write breakfast.

            If you want more details, please email news@writerswrite.co.za

            ~~~~~

            Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

            Writers Write - Write to communicate

            Social Media Chill Pill - 15 Top Tips For Writers On Social Media


            Building a social media platform is vital for any writer, but getting started can be overwhelming and frustrating. You spend hours writing a post only to get three views - one is your mother, the other is from your bestie and the last is someone who made a typo in their Google search. 

            Why do we expose ourselves to this ridicule and torture? Because publishers expect you to have an author platform and if you are self-publishing, most of your sales will be generated through your platform. And the more you do it the more you will enjoy it.

            What can you do? Sharing is caring, but you should decide what you are comfortable with sharing. You don’t have to share details of your private life, but social media is about interacting with an audience and allowing them a glimpse into your writing life. Some people don’t mind sharing their personal details and they post many personal things, others don’t. It is up to you to decide. There is no right or wrong here. 

            These are seven tips for writers starting out on social media:

            1. Build a home: You want your social media posts to drive traffic to your blog. Most blogging platforms are free. Try WordPress, Tumblr, Blogger or Posthaven. Most of them allow you to share from there. 
            2. Keep it simple: Consistency is the most important thing when it comes to Social Media. Establishing a social media platform is time consuming. Don’t try to cover all the platforms. Pick one or two to start with. You can add more platforms later, but trying to put something up on seven platforms daily will be a challenge.
            3. Choose your platforms carefully: The more time you spend on a platform the faster and more effectively you will be able to use it. Spend some time on a platform before you start posting to it. 
            4. Not for you: If you don’t like a social media platform don’t use it. This sounds simple, but often I hear people “You HAVE to be on this or that platform”. Each platform has different benefits for writers. Find a space you are comfortable with and avoid those that you don’t enjoy. 
            5. Make a friend: Find and follow writers you like. Look at what they post. Share their stuff, but remember to put something up, at least once a week that is yours.
            6. Kill the deadweight: Shut down platforms that don’t work for you. If, like me, you have more platforms than you can remember make an effort to shut them down. An inactive account doesn’t look great.   
            7. Less is more: It is better to have two or three platforms that really work for you. If you are happy with only one, stick to and do your best. You can share your posts to most platforms, e.g. Share your Facebook post to Twitter. You could use something like Hootsuite, but it might be overkill if you are starting out.  

            Authors should consider these eight platforms: 
            1. Facebook is the biggest platform. The numbers are good. You can find and follow many authors. You have to pay to promote your page, or you can use your personal profile.  
            2. Google+ is growing and it is more organic than Facebook. 
            3. Twitter can be chaotic in the beginning. Search #writers, #amwriting and #writetip. It is very popular with celebs and journalists as well.  
            4. Pinterest is my personal favourite and great for inspiration. You will find tons of writing articles. The challenge is not to get side tracked by all the pretty pictures
            5. LinkedIn is good for freelancers. It is a great place to keep and update your CV. You can share the link to your profile with anyone who wishes to see it. 
            6. Go onto You Tube and find videos of your favourite authors. Not only do they give you great advice, you can share the links to your platforms. 
            7. Tumblr is awesome for all things wordy. It is a blogging platform and great for writers and especially beginner bloggers. There are tons of prompts and inspiring reads. 
            8. Goodreads is brilliant for tracking your reading. You will befriend people with similar tastes and never lack for a book suggestion. Write and share reviews of books that you have read and post them to your blog.
            Lastly, don’t let social media overwhelm you. Chill. Go at your own pace and share what you are comfortable with and as often as you are comfortable with. Get out there and get social. Don’t take on too much, be consistent and be patient. You will get there.

            If you want to learn how to write for social media or how to write a book, email news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

             by Mia Botha

            If you enjoyed this post, you will love:

            1. Where's the baddie? - What my six-year-old taught me about storytelling
            2. 12 Books I Am Planning To Read In 2015
            3. Four ways to remove padding words

            Mia Botha facilitates for Writers Write. She is also a novelist, a ghost writer, and the winner of the Mills&Boon Voice of Africa Competition. When she isn’t writing, she is the mother of two children and the wife of a very lucky man. Follow Mia on Pinterest  and Facebook and  Tumblr  and  Twitter.

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              Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

              Writers Write - Write to communicate

              Demystifying Self-Publishing - A Writers Write Event

              Join us for breakfast when one of our Writers Write graduates, Per Ostberg, talks about his exciting and exploratory journey from attending our Writers Write course to self-publishing his memoir PERspective.

              Per will outline the eight simple steps he took to get a book from idea to launched. These include demystifying self-publishing platforms and online tools, talking about the challenges he met on the way, as well as how he realised the author had become a publisher.

              When? 18 April 2015
              Where? Winehouse Restaurant, Ten Bompas Boutique Hotel10 Bompas Road, Dunkeld, Johannesburg (GPS)
              What Time? 08:00 for 08:30 - 10:30
              How Much? R240 per person (This includes a delicious breakfast and the self-publishing talk by Per Ostberg)
              RSVP? news@writerswrite.co.za

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              Writers Write offers the best writing courses in South Africa. If you want to learn how to write a book, write for social media, and improve your business writing, send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za for more information.

              Writers Write - Write to communicate